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Latest Race Results from Cyclingnews.com
  1. Chloe Dygert-Owen (Sho-Air Twenty20) soloed to her fourth straight stage at the Colorado Classics to make it a clean sweep for the week and seal the final overall title. The American rider made it four-from-four with a decisive attack with 5km to go to leave her breakaway companion Janelle Cole (LUX-Flexential) and take a memorable win. As well as the four stage wins, and the GC, Dygert-Owen won every jersey going at the event. 

    Cole hung on to take a well-deserved second place on the stage after she initiated the winning move, while Emma White (Rally UHC Cycling) finished at the front of the chasing bunch to take third on the day.

    Aside from the four stage wins and the overall victory, Dygert-Owen also took home the jerseys for best young rider, sprint classification and mountains classification.

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    "We had a different role to play today in the race,” Dygert-Owen told Cyclingnews in the finishing straight. “It would be Jen [Valente] for the sprint, or if I got off I got off, or any other teammates, too. So it was a perfect way to end the week, and a perfect send-off for our teammate Allie [Dragoo] as her retirement.

    "I kind of forgot that there was a sprint there, so I kind of lucked out," Dygert-Owen said. "And then again I looked back and everyone was hanging their heads again, so I decided to just send it. But then it came back and Janelle [Cole] put in an awesome attack and I just went with that and rode with her for alap. I had good legs so I went for it again."

    For Cole's part, the 22-year-old was happy to have made the winning move with the race's strongest rider.

    How it unfolded

    You can read more at Cyclingnews.com

  2. Nairo Quintana (Movistar) laid down a huge marker on stage 2 of the Vuelta a Espana with a fine solo stage win in Calpe. The Movistar leader attacked with just over 3km to go from an elite group of six and held off a late charge to win ahead of Nicholas Roche (Team Sunweb) and Primoz Roglic (Jumbo Visma).

    The six-man group formed with around 20km remaining on a stage that many predicted would end in a bunch sprint. The key move was sparked by a joint attack from Roche and Mikel Nieve (Mitchelton Scott) with the pair quickly joined by Quintana, Rigoberto Uran (EF Education First), Roglic, and Fabio Aru (UAE Team Emirates). The group of six was too strong for a chase that was lead by race leader Miguel Angel Lopez (Astana) who was left isolated after a punishing stage.

    As the leaders slowly built on their advantage the fight went out of the Lopez group, with the advantage slipping to almost 40 seconds at the finish line. Quintana’s attack with 3km to go was well-timed and perfectly executed. Nieve and Roglic both looked to mount a chase but the Colombian had more than enough in the tank to hold on for his second Grand Tour stage win of the season.

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    Roche claimed a well-deserved second place that saw him move into the race lead by two seconds ahead of Quintana with Uran a further six seconds down. Lopez has fallen to fifth at 33 seconds.

    After two stages this Vuelta has proved to be to anything but predictable but Quintana has at least shown that he has the intent to contest for the overall standings. Lopez wasn't the only rider caught out on a day of intense drama. Wilco Kelderman, Esteban Chaves, Rafal Majka, and David De La Cruz all lost varying degrees of time.

    How it unfolded

    After yesterday's dramatic team time trial, the start of stage 2 was dominated by the riders and the entire Vuelta a Espana holding a minute's silence as they paid their respects to Bjorg Lambrecht, who tragically lost his life at the Tour de Pologne just a few weeks ago. His Lotto Soudal teammates, still raw from their loss, were intent on putting in a performance for the late Belgian and it was Sander Armée who made it into the main breakaway of the day. He was joined by Jonathan Lastra (Caja Rural-Seguros RGA), and eventually Willie Smit (Katusha-Alpecin), and Angel Madrazo (Burgos-BH) as the four riders established a lead of almost seven minutes over the early climbs.

    You can read more at Cyclingnews.com

  3. Elia Viviani (Deceuninck-QuickStep) claimed his third straight EuroEyes Cyclassics victory in Hamburg on Sunday, taking out the bunch sprint ahead of Caleb Ewan (Lotto Soudal) and Giacomo Nizzolo (Dimension Data).

    The European champion timed his surge to perfection, waiting patiently as teammate Michael Morkov set a blistering pace into the final 200m then surged with such force that no one could come around.

    A hot and sunny late summer day welcomed the peloton to the 216km with a start and finish in Hamburg. In the relatively flat lands of northern Germany, decent climbs are hard to find, but this race always includes four times up the Waseberg - a 700m climb but with a gradient up to 9.7 per cent gradient. All four climbs come in roughly the last third of the race, with the final one only 8 km before finish. However, the race traditionally ends in a bunch sprint, as it did again today.

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    Four riders got away early and after 50km had a lead of over ten minutes with Gijs Van Hoecke (CCC), Jose Goncalves (Katusha-Alpecin), Alex Frame (Trek-Segafredo) and Igor Boev (Gazprom-RusVelo) part of the group.

    Frame couldn't keep up with his companions and was the first to fall back. The remaining trio fought hard but had no chance against the sprinters' teams. The gap fell dramatically, down to 2:30 with 40km still to go.

    Their time was over on Waseberg as various riders, including Bora-hansgrohe's Peter Sagan, attempted to get away, but no one was allowed to stay away.

    You can read more at Cyclingnews.com

  4. Marianne Vos (CCC-Liv) has repeated last year's success at the Ladies Tour of Norway, winning three consecutive stages and the race overall again. On the final stage from the Svinesund bridge to Halden, Vos opened her sprint early and took the lead, winning stage 4 ahead of Marta Bastianelli (Team Virtu Cycling) and Ilaria Sanguineti (Valcar Cylance).

    By winning the final stage in the yellow jersey, Vos obviously also is the overall race winner, 29 seconds ahead of Coryn Rivera (Team Sunweb) and 41 seconds ahead of Leah Kirchmann (Team Sunweb). Additionally, Vos takes the lead in the UCI Women's WorldTour ranking.

    "It was a long stage, but there was so much action that it was really fast," Vos said on the race podium. "First and foremost, it was about being safe in the general classification. But when we got to the final lap and I still was in a good position, we decided also to go for the sprint. The team did a perfect job all day to keep me fresh and safe, so I had something left in the tank and wanted to give my all on the finish."

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    How it happened

    At 156.2 kilometres, stage 4 was the longest of the race. Starting at the Norwegian-Swedish border on the Svinesund bridge, the rolling parcours wound its way back and forth between the two countries, with two classified climbs, a seven-kilometre gravel section, and two intermediate sprints as well as a special border sprint at the final border crossing back into Norway where almost four laps of a technical circuit in Halden that included many turns and a short cobblestone section concluded the stage.

    15 riders did not start or abandoned during the stage, feeling the effects of yesterday's crashes. At the first intermediate sprint, Emilie Moberg (Team Virtu Cycling) took full points, securing the green points jersey for herself. Soraya Paladin (Alé Cipollini) did the same on the first classified climb to win the polka-dot mountain jersey.

    Ursa Pintar (BTC City Ljubljana) got away solo on the second classified climb after 60 km and held a lead of up to 1:10 minutes, but the Slovenian was reeled in with 70 km to go. Next to break away were Diana Peñuela (Alé Cipollini), Margarita Victoria Garcia (Movistar Team), and Silvia Pollicini (Valcar Cylance). This trio was 1:40 minutes ahead at the special border sprint with 55 km to go, won by Garcia. Parkhotel Valkenburg of stage 1 winner Lorena Wiebes closed the gap to less than a minute at the 40-kilometre mark, and ten kilometres later the breakaway was reeled in.

    You can read more at Cyclingnews.com

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